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The Underground Garage: Home / The Radio Show / Archived Shows / Shows 699-600 / Shows 619-610 / Show 616 - A Conversation with David Chase Part 1
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Show 616 - A Conversation with David Chase Part 1

Show 616 - A Conversation with David Chase Part 1

Air Date:

Tuesday, 21 January 2014

Hey baby, Little Steven here.

Join me this week in the Underground Garage for part 1 of A Conversation with David Chase.

We will discuss music on TV and in the movies, and play a bunch of cool stuff from Sopranos and Lilyhammer soundtracks.

Joining us will be the Cream, the Chiffons, the Students and Procol Harum.

Come find out what Paulie Walnuts, Frank “the Fixer” Tagliano, and Stuart Appelbaum have in common.

It’s the only Rock n’ Roll dance party on the radio, and two temperate zones.

I’ll see you this weekend in the Underground Garage.

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5.0/5 rating (13 votes)

Comments: 31 Comments

  • Playlist:

    Set 1:

    Be My Baby (Ronettes)

    Born To Run (Bruce Springsteen & the E Street Band)

    Everyday Of The Week (Students)

    Cold Cold Hearts (Launderettes)

    High Fidelity (Elvis Costello)

    Can’t Be So Bad (Moby Grape)

     

    Set 2:

    What Is The Reason (Rascals)

    Inside Of Me (Little Steven & the Disciples Of Soul)

    Big Beat Strong (Woggles)

    This Magic Moment (the Drifters)

    Twentieth Century Boy (T Rex)

     

    Set 3:

    Pretty Little Angel Eyes (Curtis Lee)

    When The Battle Is Over (Delaney and Bonnie)

    King Midas (Stupidity)

    My Lover’s Prayer (Otis Redding)

    Sunshine Of Your Love (Cream)

     

    Set 4:

    Jackie Kennedy (Ingrid Olava)

    I’m Not Like Everybody Else (Kinks)

    I’m Gonna Dry My Eyes (Chiffons)

    4th of July (X)

    Fool For You (Impressions)

     

    Set 5:

    Mystic Eyes (Them)

    Safe European Home (Clash)

    Heard You Got A Thing For Me (Cocktail Slippers)

    Moonlight Mile (Rolling Stones)

    Devil Came From Kansas (Procol Harum)

Comments (31)

  • DavidWhite
    01/27/2014

    Great show, but Steven is wrong to credit David Chase for being the first person to use songs as score on television. I don't know who was first, but a decade before "The Sopranos" came along "The Wonder Years" made music a significant part of the show, and mostly used garage-friendly songs, too.

    The theme song was Joe Cocker singing "With A Little Help From My Friends". The pilot episode opened with "Turn Turn Turn" by The Byrds as score and ended with "When A Man Loves A Woman" by Percy Sledge. Another first season show beautifully used The Beatles "Blackbird" as the score throughout the episode.

    But perhaps the most impressive use of music as score was the sixth and final episode of the first season. That show used "The Letter" by Joe Cocker, "Magic Carpet Ride" and "Born To Be Wild" by Steppenwolf, "Louie Louie" by The Kingsman, "There's A Kind Of Hush" by Herman's Hermits, "Tears Of A Clown" by Smokey Robinson and The Miracles, "Cherish" by The Association, "The Girl From Ipanema" by Astrud Gilberto, and "I've Been Loving You (For Too Long)" by Otis Redding. That's NINE songs in a single 30 minute episode!

    "The Wonder Years" has been off the air for twenty years now and still has not been released on DVD. The problem is that at the time music licensing only included broadcast rights because there was no such thing as DVDs (or the Internet) back then. So the cost of licensing the music to make the show available on DVD or even on Netflix is so high that it hasn't happened. Releasing the episodes without the classic songs would be possible economically, but the music was so important to the show it would ruin it to do that, so they haven't.

    Yes, David Chase deserves a lot of credit for the way he used music on TV, but Neal Marlens and Carol Black, creators of "The Wonder Years" deserve a mention as well.

    [PS - Wonder Years fun fact: Karen Arnold, one of the show's main characters, was played by Olivia d'Abo, daughter of Mike d'Abo who, as singer for Manfred Mann is an Underground Garage regular.]

    • Steed Colliss
      01/27/2014

      And who could forget the Beach Boys' "Good Vibrations" in that episode where Kevin meets a girl on the beach… Not just a girl "but an older woman" as he puts it…

      And Olivia also being, Maryam's cousin (The Living Daylights, San Antonio)… Yeah, you got to be French to know about San Antonio

    • ArthurAllen
      01/27/2014

      Before Mr. Chase produced The Sporanos, he also produced Northern Exposure. This series also features surrealistic segments, some of the same actors (Jerry Alder), good use of music, and a completely different tone. Maybe that's what Steve meant when Chase pioneered rock music on television, if you don't count Miami Vice.

      • DavidWhite
        01/28/2014

        Northern Exposure started in 1990. The Wonder Years started in 1988, so even if he were referring to that show (and I don't remember him mentioning it at all), it still is not earlier. But Miami Vice debuted in 1984 and certainly did use a lot of music as score. Does anyone know of a show before 1984 that used a lot of music?

        • ArthurAllen
          02/02/2014

          WKRP In Cincinnati also featured a lot of real songs, but they were mostly just songs that the DJs were playing. The songs were not used to underlie moods in the show the way music on TV would be used later.

          • Michael L Geiger
            02/23/2014

            A couple of moments I remember from WKRP where scenes with songs that set the mood...When Johnny Fever is playing "dogs" by Pink Floyd and Mr.Carlson comes in and asks him what "orchestra" that was FUNNY scene would not have ben the same without it...and when Les Nessman was getting ready for a date with Jennifer and he tries on a wig "Hot Blooded" by Foreigner was playing also would not be the same without it...

      • DavidWhite
        01/28/2014

        I might be able to answer my own question. I just came across an article published in 2002 by Newsday about music in television. It credits Miami Vice (84-89), The Wonder Years (88-93), and Northern Exposure (90-95) as the first three television shows to make significant use of music as score. Here is a version of the article that was published by the LA Times:

        http://articles.latimes.com/2002/dec/04/entertainment/et-holston4

        • Steed Colliss
          01/29/2014

          Another song just popped into my mind from "The Wonder Years": Iron Butterfly's "In-a-Gadda-Da-Vida" in the episode where Kevin and Winnie are supposed to make out at this party hosted by the "Hugh Hefner of high school"...

  • Steed Colliss
    01/28/2014

    Okay... What happenned here ? On the rockfm podcast, some songs were switched between the first and last sets ("Born to Run", "Everyday of the Week", "Mystic Eyes" and "Safe European Home")... (thought I know that the podcast is nowhere linked to the LSUG and they do edit stuff...)

    All in all, a great interview for anyone who wants to be a writer/director/producer in the TV or movie business...

  • michael j farrelly
    01/28/2014

    Pete Seeger

    All freaks, misfits, and outcasts were better off because of all he did in music, for the environment, and for our freedom.

    Peace

    • ArthurAllen
      02/02/2014

      I heard the next week's show about the influence of Bob Dylan and folk music just after Pete Seeger's death.

  • slimify
    01/28/2014

    Fascinating conversation about the marriage of music and film - great topic and perfect guest - for LS... ey!

    I love the second set discussion about sound/music in film (diegetic and non-diegitic?) Some fav's that come to mind or maybe one of the greatest song/film diegetic moments ever would be Michael Madsen with razor blade in hand in Reservoir Dogs and Steelers Wheel "Stuck In The Middle With You" on the friggin' radio... Or maybe The Dude's car ride with CCR's "Lookin' Out My Back Door" playing on the radio... Or maybe The Blues Brothers on stage at Bob's County Bunker playing "Gimme Some Lovin" or "Rawhide" or "Stand By Your Man"... shit - this is fun!

    • Steed Colliss
      01/31/2014

      HAhahaha !!! That scene with the dude in his car... Showing everything that should not be done in a car: Unfastened seat belt, drinking beer and smoking a joint !!!!! By the way... Anu=yone noticed how lazy the Dude is ? He's so lazy, that even when he goes bowling, he doesn't bowl... We see both Donnie and Walter throwing a bowling ball, but never the Dude !!! There should be a show dedicated to the Dude or the Coen brothers...

  • Wonky Willy
    01/28/2014

    Hey, anyone remember Miami Vice? I thought they made excellent use of music, the most amazing scene ever when Crockett was racing his Ferrari thru the Miami night to a crime scene, and the roar of the engine matched the chords of Dire Strats' "Brothers in Arms"...awesome...

  • Mike Rice
    01/29/2014

    "Homicide: Life on the Street", the great drama that aired Friday nights on NBC from 1993 to 1999 made excellent use of music with film as well. The Kinks' "Well Respected Man", Barbara Lewis' "Hello Stranger", "Only Happy When it Rains" by Garbage, "Boom Boom Boom" by The Iguanas, "Not Ready Yet" by The Eels just to name a few. HOLS never has received the accolades that it deserved. It was a superb show despite the artistic constraints and cancellation threats that it constantly lived under.

  • robert burgoyne
    01/30/2014

    Theres some good music in " Crime Story" as well, don't forget.

    • DavidWhite
      01/30/2014

      "Crime Story" started in 1986, putting it between "Miami Vice" and "The Wonder Years". I don't recall how much of the music (if any) was used as score, but the show had (a new recording of) Del Shannon's "Runaway" as its theme and the musical directors for the show were Todd Rundgren and Al Kooper.

      Michael Mann was responsible for both "Miami Vice" and "Crime Story". Also in 1986, the same year "Crime Story" debuted, Mann directed the film "Manhunter". Who can forget how that film used the full version of "In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida" in the final climax? Perhaps Michael Mann is the original pioneer of music on television.

      • Steed Colliss
        01/31/2014

        I guess I'll really have to watch that movie... I knew it was sort of the "prequel" of "Silence of the Lambs" and had started to watch it some time in 1995, but never got further than twenty or twenty-five minutes of it...

        Speaking of Michael Mann, who can forget "Band of the Hand" with the title song by Bob Dylan and the Heartbreakers and score by Andy Summers of the Police...

  • Robert P Smarse Jr.
    01/30/2014

    13 comments and ONLY 2 people bothered to post their star ratings!! C'MON-MAN! PLEASE post your star ratings! Thank You Very Much! Sincerely, SMRZ!

  • Robert P Smarse Jr.
    01/30/2014

    13 comments and ONLY 2 people bothered to post their star ratings!! C'MON-MAN! PLEASE post your star ratings! Thank You Very Much! Sincerely, SMRZ!

    • Steed Colliss
      01/30/2014

      Don't look at me. Bobby... I've already put my five star rating on every show in the archives... All those that the jukebox is working anyway...

      • Robert P Smarse Jr.
        01/30/2014

        Hello Steed! I would NEVER pass judgment on because you do so much for The Underground Garage. You Are The Man! #1 Charter Member Of The Garage. My comment was not directed at you at all. You do so much for all true members. The Administrator just passed the word down from above regarding the lack of star ratings. Take care, Mr. Collis! Pax Em Biscum! SMRZ!

        • rivardm
          02/16/2014

          Good reminder, SMRZ! I will give a 5 as usual. Great interview. One of our leaders strength.

          Go Tigers! - Big Mike

  • ginny miller
    01/31/2014

    dated as it seems now, The Big Chill may have been the first movie to use songs to make up for a weak story

  • lucyhenley
    01/31/2014

    What about that show China Beach? That had a lot of music in it, but I think that one was 1988.

  • lucyhenley
    01/31/2014

    What about that show China Beach? That had a lot of music in it, but I think that one was 1988.

  • jcjohnson63
    02/01/2014

    what a fascinating show! never knew much about david chase so i looked him up on wikipedia. the only thing i watched that he was invovled in was the rockford files. cool show.love not fade away!!! maybe he needs to do a bio pic or two?? as far as the greta debate- Miami Vice is the grandaddy of this whole scene!! and did you know that the Beatles have outrageous prices for their tunes for a reason?? they are picky about who uses their original recordings!!! give them some credit!! can;t wait to hear part TWO!!!

  • Chris Dougherty
    02/03/2014

    Liked the show, great interview. Steven, are you going to get away with "F" bombs that were dropped by you and Tony Soprano?

  • Ron Lynch
    02/17/2014

    Born To Run (Bruce Springsteen & the E Street Band), Inside Of Me (Little Steven & the Disciples Of Soul), Sunshine Of Your Love (Cream), Fool For You (Impressions) & Mystic Eyes (Them) Yeah 5 cool ones, Great show.
    Thanks Stevie, Keep on Rockin.

  • rayner
    02/21/2014

    sorry steve you did to much talking didn't hear from david chase to much ruin a good show

  • Michael L Geiger
    02/23/2014

    Happy Days had a LOT of music between scenes...especially when the gang was at Al's drive-in...

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